OMNI Solutions Group Blog

OMNI Solutions Group has been serving the Washington D.C. metropolitan area since 1994, providing IT Support such as technical help-desk support, computer support, and consulting to small and medium-sized businesses.

Protect Your Business with Strong Network Security Practices

Protect Your Business with Strong Network Security Practices

With the surge in the number of small and medium businesses that have fallen prey to malware and cyber criminals, there is a lot of focus of what an organization can do to prevent being a victim and how the company should handle themselves after an attack. There is another key factor to preventing cyber criminals from penetrating into your network: your employees.

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An SMB’s Guide to Understanding HIPAA

An SMB’s Guide to Understanding HIPAA

Security has never been easy for any business that deals with sensitive information. Nowadays, even a small business that uses an Internet connection has to worry about hackers and malware of all types. This is especially problematic for small healthcare offices that need to keep sensitive information secure and safe from online threats.


This is primarily due to the fact that file storage systems are becoming increasingly reliant on connected digital systems. Traditional file storage systems are inefficient and susceptible to all sorts of problems; primarily user error, document destruction, and theft. While digital systems are now capable of more efficiently storing sensitive patient data, this comes at the major risk of hacking attacks. Cyber criminals understand how valuable personally identifiable information is, making healthcare institutions lucrative targets.

In particular, hospitals are feeling the effects of hacking attacks--mainly due to the crippling effects of ransomware. Hackers understand how crucial a hospital’s data is to its operations, so they’re more likely to shell out huge amounts of revenue in order to save their data from ransomware. In most cases (this goes for larger enterprises too), hospitals have little choice but to comply with a hacker’s demands.

To protect the data of patients in healthcare networks and systems, HIPAA governs guidelines for how organizations protect sensitive data. Here are some tips to help you keep your business HIPAA compliant.

  • Use a quality data backup and disaster recovery solution. You want to make sure that your business is equipped with tools to not only back up, but also restore, your critical and sensitive data. This includes making sure that you have an optimal recovery point objective, as well as a quality recovery time objective. Lastly, you need your data stored not just on-site, but also in the cloud or an external data center for safe keeping.
  • Implement enterprise-level security solutions. Regardless of whether or not your business handles sensitive data, you should always be using security solutions like firewalls, antivirus, and spam blocking technology. A Unified Threat Management solution is a great way to take advantage of preventative security solutions.
  • Use encryption. Often times, organizations won’t see the need to encrypt their data specifically because they’re already using other security measures. They don’t think that there’s a chance that their data will be stolen. While HIPAA doesn’t necessarily call for encryption, we highly recommend it. Encryption makes any stolen data practically impossible to decipher--or, at least, not worth the hacker’s effort.
  • Consult professionals in the IT field. Your business or organization specializes in a particular craft--not IT security. Therefore, it makes sense to bring in IT professionals who have been around the block a time or two to guarantee that you don’t overlook the details of HIPAA compliance.

If your business is having trouble keeping up with HIPAA compliance, OMNI Solutions Group can help. We understand the ins and outs of HIPAA compliance and want to ensure that your practice doesn’t get stuck with budget-breaking fines from failing to adhere to HIPAA standards. To learn more, reach out to us at 301-869-6890.

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Be on the Lookout Executives, Hackers are Targeting You!

Be on the Lookout Executives, Hackers are Targeting You!

Let’s say that you’re walking down the hallway of your office when you bypass a team member from accounting. They tell you that the wire transfer you requested has been completed successfully, but you don’t remember ever asking for such a thing. You take a look through your books and see that a ton of money was sent to some random stranger who took on your identity.


You may have heard about CEO fraud, which is commonly referred to as “whaling.” It’s like a phishing scheme, but on a much more intricate scale. Instead of faking the identity of another employee, or someone from a financial institution or government agency, the hacker will try to use the identity of a business owner or CEO instead. The idea is to use an employee’s fear of confrontation and eagerness to comply with requests to the hacker’s advantage--and you’d be surprised by how often it works.

In particular, wire transfers are proving to be a lucrative option for hackers who manage to trick users. As reported by ITProPortal: “Individuals create bogus messages seemingly from a senior leader, for example the CEO, which ask employees to wire funds across to them. The messages ultimately trick employees into transferring large amounts of cash electronically.” The average fraudulent wire transfer is valued at approximately $67,000, with some going well above. Plus, according to the FBI, over the past three years CEO fraud has cost businesses over $3 billion.

In most cases, wire transfers are difficult, if not impossible, to challenge, so your best chance at recovering from one is to not experience it in the first place. They are simply much too fast and are often finite in nature. Therefore, the most pressing matter is to address how your business can handle this shocking amount of growth in CEO fraud. You need to start by addressing how your staff handles unsolicited requests via email, telephone, or otherwise. Here are a few tips to consider for your business.

  • Implement hands-on phishing scam training: There’s no better teacher than hands-on training. Implement a training procedure where you purposely expose your employees to messages similar to phishing scams. See how they react to them, and if it’s not favorably, go through the proper protocol that they should keep in mind.
  • Always check in person before sending credentials, or anything else: In general, emails requesting suspicious or sensitive information should be cross-checked by either in-person communication, or by checking the email address and domain from which the message originated. However, some hackers have the ability to spoof email addresses, so it’s usually best to check with whoever supposedly sent the message.
  • Educate employees on best practices: This goes back to hands-on phishing scam training. It’s important to remind your team of security best practices, and regularly quiz them on how to avoid phishing and CEO fraud.

To learn more about CEO fraud and other types of security red flags, reach out to OMNI Solutions Group at 301-869-6890.

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Study Shows Way Too Many Businesses Ignore Insider Threats

Study Shows Way Too Many Businesses Ignore Insider Threats

Insider threats are an unpleasant reality of working with sensitive information, though you might be relieved to hear that not all instances of insider threats have malicious intentions. Then again, maybe you aren’t relieved since a threat is still a threat. Either way, we’ll discuss some statistics concerning insider threats, and what you can do about them.


Insider threats are defined as internal threats that could come in the form of either malicious or negligent users. Perhaps an employee recently quit and left the office in a flurry of madness, or maybe you have employees who just don’t care to follow security best practices. Either way, insider threats are major problems that need to be addressed.

Internal and External Threats: Reality vs Expectations
A study by Accenture and HfS Research shows that 69 percent of businesses have experienced the theft or destruction of data due to internal threats, compared to only 57 percent experiencing the same due to external threats. In contrast, only 55 percent expect to become the victim of an internal threat, while 80 percent expect external affairs to cause trouble. The lesson to be learned is that you need to be prepared for all types of threats--even those from the inside.

Exposure of Sensitive Data to the End User
The Ponemon Institute conducted a study in which 62 percent of users felt that they had access to data that they weren’t supposed to have access to. In essence, a user-access control system needs to be put into place to keep users from glimpsing sensitive or private information, such as employee salaries or personally identifiable information (Social Security numbers, birth dates, home addresses, etc).

Reaction Time to Insider Threats
According to Ponemon, the reaction time to insider threats varied. Some organizations responded quickly, while others went months, or even years before finding out:

  • Within 24 hours: 24 percent
  • Within a week: 19 percent
  • Within a month: 14 percent
  • Within 6 months: 20 percent
  • Within a year: 9 percent
  • More than a year: 14 percent

It’s somewhat surprising that so many organizations took so long to find out, but it’s a clear indicator that something’s wrong. Businesses need to be able to find out who accesses sensitive files, and why, at a glance. Monitoring network traffic and activity can provide this critical function.

The Ability to Respond to Insider Threats
This one’s simple; SANS Institute reports that 31.9 percent of organizations have no way to combat insider threats, while 68.1 percent do have the ability to respond. If so many organizations have the capabilities to do so, then why don’t they? Perhaps they just aren’t aware of the activity.

How Effective Preventative Measures Are
SANS Institute reports that:

  • Only 9 percent of businesses have proven techniques to prevent insider threats from taking root.
  • 42 percent claim to have tools but haven’t used them.
  • 36.4 percent are in the process of implementing processes to prevent insider threats.
  • A paltry 2.3 percent aren’t concerned at all about insider threats.

Potential Vulnerabilities
Mimecast claims that 45 percent of companies feel that they’re unequipped to handle malicious insider threats within their email security--more than any of the other potential email threats. Keeping a tight grip on what leaves and enters through your business’s email stream is key to protecting your organization’s digital assets.

The Types of Insider Threats
According to Gartner, there are three types of insider threats. One, called a “second streamer” (someone who uses the data from one job to obtain revenue from another job) consists of 62 percent of insider threats. 29 percent of insider threats are called the “career launcher,” or someone who took information with them as they left a company. Only 9 percent of insider threats could be classified as sabotage.

So, how does your business handle insider threats? If you can’t answer this question, OMNI Solutions Group can. To learn more, give us a call at 301-869-6890.

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Situations Can Quickly Deteriorate When Employees Attempt to Resolve IT Issues

Situations Can Quickly Deteriorate When Employees Attempt to Resolve IT Issues

In a world where businesses either pride themselves on their security solutions, or have woefully unsecured networks, you need to understand that one of the most common threats to sensitive corporate data comes from within your organization. User error is the leading cause of data loss and security-related problems, although, it’s important to remember that they often have good intentions that may result in an unfortunate outcome.


One way this happens is with what’s called shadow IT. This is the implementation of technology solutions that may not be sanctioned by your organization’s IT department. For example, an employee might choose to download a free antivirus if they see that their workstation’s antivirus software license has expired. Or, if they don’t have a word processing solution, they may look for alternatives on the Internet. While they may have only good intentions when implementing the solution, this can lead to several security discrepancies that could put your data at risk.

Another way that this might happen is when an employee is working hard on a project in order to meet a deadline, but the software license expires and they are no longer able to access the tools they need to continue working. Rather than go through the proper channels (especially if IT is bogged-down with work, and is unresponsive to urgent requests), the employee might choose to take matters into their own hands and find a solution that works. The employee can now get back to doing their job, but they’ve just implemented shadow IT, which is a major red flag for businesses.

When it comes to shadow IT, the primary concern is the source of the solution. Where did the software that your employee found come from? Depending on what exactly they downloaded, it could be a seemingly-benign open-source software from a reputable website. However, if they found it on some ad-encrusted sketchy corner of the Internet, you might be in trouble. Freeware is often exploited by hackers to spread their influence, knowing full well that people will download it and use it, rather than pay for a software license from a reputable vendor.

The best way to prevent shadow IT is to control the permissions that you provide for your employees on their workstations. Downloading a new software solution often requires administrator permission, so when you remove these permissions from a workstation, you’re forcing the employee to go through the proper channels when requesting a new software to work with. It also helps to educate your employees on how to use the technology solutions your business has adopted--as another reason why they might choose to use something different could be the fact that they’re unfamiliar using other applications.

In general, having a responsive IT department can minimize the trouble that your team has with its IT solutions can be a great deterrent for shadow IT. When they don’t run into hiccups, and they are comfortable using your business’s technology solutions, they won’t feel the need to implement additional solutions that can put your company’s data at risk.

To learn more about shadow IT, and the threats that it poses for your business, reach out to us at 301-869-6890.

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Ransomware: Coming to a Mobile Device Near You

Ransomware: Coming to a Mobile Device Near You

Ransomware, the unpleasant form of malware dedicated to denying users access to their own device, has become more prominent with mobile technology. While ransomware is typically associated with desktop computers, it’s fully capable of infecting mobile devices. Therefore, it should be no surprise that cases Mobile-based ransomware have increased nearly four-fold in the past year.


According to software security group Kaspersky Lab, their customers in Germany were victimized by mobile ransomware at the highest rate worldwide, followed by Canada, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Furthermore, Kaspersky cited that it protected 35,412 mobile users from ransomware between April of 2014 and March of 2015. During the next year, that total surged upwards to a total of 136,532 users protected. Mind you, these totals aren’t factoring in the number of users who fell victim to their attacks, meaning the actual totals of mobile ransomware victims are likely much, much higher.

Much like the ransomware that attacks desktop and laptop systems, mobile ransomware infects the victim’s phone--however, rather than encrypting the data contained on the phone, which many users have backed up, ransomware on a mobile device will simply block access to apps and display a note explaining how to pay the demanded ransom.

What’s more, many of these mobile ransomwares fight dirty, even by their hacking standards. One particular ransomware originating in Ukraine locks the keys and replaces the home screen with a fraudulent FBI warning and a MoneyPak voucher code. The recipient of such ransomware is someone who (according to the warning) has broken the law by visiting illegal adult-themed websites. The ransomware shows screenshots from said websites included from the user’s browser history, and demands a $500 fine.

Besides the repulsive nature of the screenshots, the most terrifying thing is how indiscriminate these attacks are in selecting their victims. All one needs to do is click on the wrong link on their smartphone to be infected. This was proven in 2014, when a 12-year-old girl unintentionally installed some malware that locked her phone. The malware downloaded some very illegal videos, and threatened to contact the FBI if she didn’t pay $500.

So, how can you defend yourself from mobile ransomware?

  • Update software on a regular basis: Malware and software updates are in a constant race to improve upon themselves, which means that outdated software simply won’t stand up to the more advanced malware. However, if regularly updated, your software stands a much better chance in fighting off an attack.
  • Utilize a cloud-based backup: While not the ideal circumstance, if your cell phone turns out to be beyond saving (without a complete and comprehensive wipe, at least) you will be very happy that your contacts and documents are safe in the cloud.
  • Avoid questionable downloads: Simply put, if you don’t trust the source of a download, don’t download it. Otherwise, you are inviting an attack into your phone.
  • Finally, don’t be afraid to contact the authorities: For this we return to the 12-year-old girl from before, who ultimately contacted her local authorities to report the malware incident. Even if there is illegal material on your phone, law enforcement members will be able to tell that it’s a plant from ransomware.

For more tips on how to avoid threats on all of your devices, contact us at 301-869-6890.

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How Inconvenient Security Protocols Can Sink Your Company

How Inconvenient Security Protocols Can Sink Your Company

Security is important for much more than just the Internet. It’s an integral part of organized society, to the point where there are several layers of security for public transportation, airports, and so much more. The only problem is that properly taking advantage of security is only as effective as how well your employees adhere to corporate policy.


Employees will often neglect security measures because they find them to be inconvenient or time-consuming. This happens every day with solutions that are designed to help keep data secure. For example, a Bring Your Own Device policy is designed to help your business keep secure information from hackers, but if your employees don’t want to go through the process of implementing BYOD on their devices, they could unnecessarily be putting your data at risk.

In the end, it comes down to freedom vs security. Employees want to use their mobile devices and have a sense of freedom for how they work, but you can’t allow this to happen without some sort of security oversight. Otherwise, you could be putting your entire business infrastructure at risk of infiltration from outside entities. Ensuring that your business follows proper security best practices is crucial to the continued functionality of your organization.

This is especially true in light of employees who don’t follow security best practices. As is the case with many online threats, employees will continue to be the weakest link in your business’s defenses if you don’t take action to remedy this. You can make patching up this vulnerability easier by reinforcing security best practices, including:

  • Regularly changing passwords: While changing your passwords is important, it can be difficult to remember passwords for all of your different accounts. This is why many organizations implement enterprise-level password managers that can securely store your passwords and call them when they’re needed. Passwords should always be complex strings of lower and upper-case letters, numbers, and symbols.
  • Spotting phishing scams: Employees should be trained on how to identify phishing scams. This includes educating them on how hackers will use phishing scams to coerce information out of them. OMNI Solutions Group can help your employees understand how best to avoid, and detect, phishing scams.
  • Using two-factor authentication: Any accounts that have access to critical information should be equipped with secondary security features, like two-factor authentication. This makes it more difficult for hackers to access accounts remotely. Two-factor authentication often means that hackers will need physical access to your device, which makes it extraordinarily difficult to hack into an account.

If you’re concerned that your team needs additional security measures put into place to enforce best practices, you can implement what’s called a Unified Threat Management (UTM) solution. A UTM consists of firewall, antivirus, spam blocking, and content filtering solutions, which are all designed to limit your business’s exposure to threats.

For more information about cyber security and other data security best practices, give OMNI Solutions Group a call at 301-869-6890.

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Before You Act on a Hack, Know the Extent of the Breach

Before You Act on a Hack, Know the Extent of the Breach

Getting hacked is a scary occurrence. It’s a major reason why you have security measures put into place. You try to avoid it as much as you can, but getting outsmarted by hackers happens to the best of us. The good news is that as long as you approach your hacking incident in a reasonable way, you can limit the amount of damage that’s done to your infrastructure.


Before you do anything else, it’s important to remain calm and not to make any rash decisions concerning your systems, like going public with your hack immediately following the breach. Before informing those who were affected, you need to know who actually was affected. This includes determining how deep the breach has gone, how much data was stolen or destroyed, and whether or not there are still underlying issues within your IT infrastructure, waiting to resurface.

Understand the Full Scope of the Attack
Before jumping to conclusions, begin by assessing what exactly happened to your IT systems. Was it a data breach, and if so, how did the intruders get in? Did they infiltrate through a spam email, or did they brute force their way into your network? Was it the cause of user error, or the result of a neglected vulnerability in your software solutions? These are all important questions that need to be asked, and you need to know the full impact of the hacking attack before anything can be done about it.

Check Which Data, If Any, Was Stolen
The next part of handling a data breach is checking what data was affected by it. Did the hacker make off with any valuable information, like Social Security numbers, credit card numbers, account usernames, passwords, or other credentials? If you know which files have been accessed, you’ll have a good grasp on the extent of the damage. However, if health records have been compromised, you might be more trouble than you’d care to admit.

Give Your IT Department Room to Clean Up the Mess
Your business needs to conduct a full investigation into the hacking attack, and take preventative measures to ensure that the system has been completely purged of the threat. This includes having an environment available for work while your IT is busy containing the problem and resolving it as quickly as possible. This also includes having the resources available to do so; your budget should be ready to deal with hacks whenever possible.

Find the Real Issue
Sometimes smaller hacking attacks are used as distractions to the real problem. For example, a virus that infects a PC could simply be a distraction to hide a trojan, which may allow the hacker to later access your network. If this happens, any attempts to clean up your systems might be rendered useless, especially if you haven’t found the trojan. You could just be inviting another hacking attack, which is counterproductive and costly.

Keep in mind, sometimes your business might not be the target, but instead just unfortunate enough to be a victim. Phishing attacks, malware, and other threats travel virally, spreading between contacts and getting picked up on unsafe websites by users.

Know Your Compliance Liability
Depending on the types of files that have been exposed to hackers, you might have a full-fledged violation of compliance laws on your hands. This can lead to expensive fines that can break your budget. Knowing where you stand on compliance, as well as what’s involved for reporting it, is a crucial step in handling a data breach.

OMNI Solutions Group can help your business handle any potential data breach, and our trusted IT professionals can assist with implementing new solutions to prevent future breaches. To learn more, give us a call at 301-869-6890.

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10 Common Security Mistakes That Can Sink Your Network

10 Common Security Mistakes That Can Sink Your Network

Most companies have to have a workforce, generally one of considerable size. Unfortunately, the more users you have, the more potential risks you run into. Of course, your workforce doesn’t collectively intend to be a security risk, but the digital world is a complicated place, with threats around every corner and malicious programs just waiting for your employed end-users to slip up. Here are ten such honest slip-ups to watch out for:

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Forget Backdoors, Hackers Can Now Infiltrate Garage Doors

Forget Backdoors, Hackers Can Now Infiltrate Garage Doors

Hackers have proven that they will do whatever it takes to get to your valuable assets, even if it means taking advantage of physical objects that work alongside a specific frequency. As it turns out, this is exactly how hacking a garage door works, and all it takes is a decade-old communications device to capture the frequency and unlock any garage door that utilizes it.

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Why Businesses Need to Quickly Distance Themselves From SQL Server 2005

Why Businesses Need to Quickly Distance Themselves From SQL Server 2005

Which database management system is running on your company’s server units? For end users, it’s not something that they put a whole lot of thought into. However, if you completely overlook your Microsoft SQL Server, you may end up running an expired version that puts your data at risk. Case in point, SQL Server 2005, which Microsoft recently ended support for.

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Alert: A New Malware to Worry About for PC Gamers Using Steam

Alert: A New Malware to Worry About for PC Gamers Using Steam

Hackers have always gone after industries that are profitable, or hold sensitive information that can be lucrative when sold under the table. As such, retailers that accumulate financial credentials are often hit by hacks. The entertainment industry is no different, and hackers continue to grow craftier in their pursuit of wealth and power. Not even Steam, the PC gamer’s most valuable software solution, is safe from the dangers of hacking attacks.

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Researchers Investigated Internet-Connected Surveillance Cameras, What They Found is Unbelievable

b2ap3_thumbnail_internet_of_things_presents_risk_400.jpgThere’s a reason why IT professionals think that the Internet of things is a major security discrepancy. Around 5.5 million new devices are being connected to the Internet every day, and are giving security experts a run for their money. The Internet of Things and its devices could potentially become a security hazard for businesses that aren’t prepared to protect their assets from hacks.

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New Technology From LG Lets You See What a Bowling Ball Sees [VIDEO]

b2ap3_thumbnail_lg_rolling_security_400.jpgNew consumer technology holds a special place in many users’ hearts. In particular, the LG Rolling Bot looks like it will be a nifty little device to leave either in your office or at home. Basically, it’s a rolling security camera that can be controlled remotely through a smartphone.

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Crafty Hackers Find Ways to Intercept Wireless Transmissions

b2ap3_thumbnail_man_in_the_middle_400.jpgThe Internet of Things is constantly growing. Seemingly every commercially-available product now has a corresponding app or some sort of connectivity to the web. As this entity grows bigger still, you begin to see things that have very little intrinsic value coming with Internet connectivity.

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Tip of the Week: Add a PIN to Windows 10 Login to Improve Security

b2ap3_thumbnail_windows_10_pin_400.jpgBusinesses all over the world are taking advantage of two-factor authentication, causing the password’s value to depreciate over time. Passwords aren’t powerful enough to keep users safe from advanced threats. Hackers are finding ways to punch holes in even the most comprehensive security solution, forcing users to focus on improving security through other means.

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Your Business Can Learn a Thing or Two From Nuclear Power Plant Security

b2ap3_thumbnail_nuclear_it_security_400.jpgWe talk about a lot of frightening technology scenarios for businesses; data loss, identity theft, and expensive hardware failures that can inflict substantial downtime and, therefore, cripple the ability of your business to sustain operations. One industry that has changed the way they manage risk, specifically the potential failure of important security systems, is the nuclear power industry. Any business can learn how to mitigate disaster by looking into the specifics of the two most horrendous nuclear meltdowns in history, the meltdown at Chernobyl in 1986, and the tsunami-induced disaster at Fukushima in 2011.

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Tip of the Week: How to Spot a DDoS Attack

b2ap3_thumbnail_ddos_400.jpgIf you are a technician and a network you are responsible for begins to go down because the traffic that is coming into the network is unusually high, there is a good chance you are experiencing a distributed denial of service attack, or DDoS. These attacks, which are extraordinarily difficult to prevent altogether, can be exceedingly costly for a business.

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Find Out What’s Lurking In “the Shadows” of Your IT

b2ap3_thumbnail_risks_of_shadow_it_400.jpgImplementing proper IT solutions is challenging for the average SMB, and it’s difficult without the aid of a proper IT department. Organizations that can’t afford a full in-house IT department sometimes resort to less savory methods of managing their technology, which can be dangerous for business continuity, data storage compliance, and security.

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How a Hacker Could Potentially Assassinate a Hospital Patient

b2ap3_thumbnail_hack_threats_400.jpgWhenever hackers show themselves, they always spell trouble. Whether it’s stealing credentials or completely taking over someone’s computer, a hacker has a plethora of targets and methods that can be irritating for the average PC user, or business executive. In fact, hackers are so crafty that they can even hack into hospital equipment.

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